tips, tipples & table talk – Week 10

Is the phrase ‘leftover wine’ an oxymoron? We know a few friends and colleagues that might think so! Nonetheless, this week’s tips, tipples and table talk has a few ideas on what to do with that leftover wine. We also have an easy, simple risotto recipe for you to try, and we introduce you to the newest, hairiest member of the ely family – and no it’s not our new sous chef Steve (kidding)!

In case you missed it last week, don’t forget that we’re giving 10% back to you, our fantastic ely customers, all summer when you use your ely loyalty card. Don’t have one yet? And if not, why not? Sign up here

Taste Tip of the Week: Simple Risotto 

This popular dish is perfect for serving at a dinner party but equally so, easy enough to make for a delicious dinner at home for one. Light enough to eat during the summer heat, you can also include almost any ingredients to adapt to your tastes. Here’s a simple risotto recipe for you to try.

What you need:

  • 1.75 litres vegetable or chicken stock
  • 4 tbsp olive oil
  • 1 small onion, finely chopped
  • 350g risotto rice
  • 85g butter
  • 6 tbsp grated parmesan cheese, plus extra for serving
  • rock salt, black pepper

How we do it:

  • Bring the stock to a boil in a medium-sized saucepan. Reduce the heat and allow to simmer gently.
  • In a separate pan, heat the olive oil over a medium heat.
  • Add the onion and, stirring all the time with a wooden spoon, cook until it softens and becomes translucent.
  • Add the rice and cook, stirring, for about 3 minutes, making sure that every grain is coated with oil.
  • Add 1 cup (250ml) of the stock and stir until absorbed.
  • Continue adding the stock, about ½ cup (125ml) at a time, stirring frequently and making sure all the liquid is absorbed before adding more.
  • When most of the stock has been added – this should take about 15-20 minutes – test a grain of rice.
  • The risotto is ready when the rice is just tender and creamy, but still ‘al dente’, with a little bite to it.
  • Remove the pan from the heat and add the butter, parmesan cheese, salt and pepper to taste.
  • Stir vigorously for about 30 seconds to give a creamy, glossy finish to the risotto
  • Add in mushrooms, asparagus, butternut squash, prawns etc. Whatever you fancy – get creative!

You can now enjoy our great value early-bird menu all evening, Mon – Sat at ely bar & brasserie, IFSC. 

risotto collage

Tipple Tip of the Week: What To Do With Leftover Wine

As our executive wine manager Ian Brosnan would argue, leftover wine is somewhat of a myth. However, we do know that sometimes you are faced with some leftover wine and the thought of throwing it down the sink (we can’t watch!) pains you. Therefore, we’ve put together a few useful tips, cooking being the most obvious (great for also popping a good splash of white in when making the above risotto recipe!), on what to do with the remains from the bottom of the bottle.

ely empty wine glass

  1. Freeze Please – First things first, fill an ice cube tray with your leftover wine and pop it straight in the freezer. Now you can use a cube or two for cooking whenever you need to.
  2. Wine Syrup – This rich syrup a bit tangy, similar to Balsamic vinegar but simmering the syrup with cinnamon or vanilla makes it sweet and delicious enough to use on pancakes or with ice cream. In a wide saucepan, combine red wine with sugar (3 cups wine to 1 cup sugar), bring to a boil, then reduce heat and simmer until syrupy and reduced to about a third of the volume. Let cool, bottle, and refrigerate.
  3. Save For Mulled Wine Season – Put leftover red wine into a freezable container and for use in the winter months. Empty the frozen wine into a large pot; add spices such as cinnamon sticks and a spoonful of whole cloves. Melt wine over medium heat, then sweeten to taste with honey, sugar, or apple juice. Simmer for 10 minutes. Serve in glasses with a citrus slice.
  4. Poaching – Soft foods taste amazing when poached  in wine flavored with aromatics and spices. White wine for eggs and fish, and sweetened red wine is perfect for poaching fruit.
  5. Salad Dressing – Leftover white wine makes for a flavoursome, fresh-tasting salad dressing. Blend wine, lemon juice, honey (if wine is sweet, leave out the honey) salt, and pepper in a bowl. Still blending (either with a fork, whisk, or the blender), slowly add olive oil. Voilà!

Learn more about wine in a fun and informal setting at an ely wine tasting evening. 

Table Talk of the Week: New Addition To The ely Family Farm

Well well, who do we have here? These magnificent creatures, and the newest additions to the ely organic family farm, are Highland cattle descendants from Scotland. These cattle are extremely adept at grazing on steep, mountainous lands which makes the limestone rocky slopes in The Burren, Co. Clare, an ideal place for them to rest.

10565035_705317519540220_2133458680609422700_n

Natural born survivors, the Highland cattle’s long horns were developed to protect themselves and their flowing locks grown to shelter them from harsh, cold winters – which makes us think they must be a little warm at the moment! Their short, stumpy legs provide them with excellent balance and surprisingly, Highland cattle can be found up to 10,000 feet high up in the Andes.

Welcome to the farm guys!

We source all of our grass fed beef, pork and lamb through our organic family farm in The Burren, Co. Clare. 

 

 

ely wines for Summer #010 – Final part!

CA10

Here goes a recap on some of the wines we’ve featured over the last couple of weeks. I’ve attached the list of wines below- hopefully you had an opportunity to try at least some of them. If you haven’t, don’t worry- there is plenty of time left in this summer, and many of these wines are ely favourites, so they might be around into autumn.

What will I be drinking for the rest of the summer- well, in moderate quantities (obviously) and in no particular order…

German Riesling must be the ultimate summer wine, low in alcohol, crisp, fresh and with perfect fruit/acid balance. My #1 choice.

Italian whites – Italy is producing some wonderful white wines from native varieties which have far more character than you may have come to expect from Italian whites. Look out for-Pinot Bianco, Gavi, Lugana, Soave, Vermentino, Verdicchio, Falanghina, Fiano, Greco and Grillo.  And when you’ve done them, try Favorita, Erbaluce, Fruliano, Grechetto, Pecorino, Inzolia, Catarratto and Zibibbio. When you done with all of them, give me a shout and I’ll list some more!

Look east! We are finally starting to see more and more wines from Eastern Europe on our shelves, and some are mighty impressive. For whites in particular look to Slovenia, Slovakia, Croatia and Greece.

Lighter reds . Sounds obvious for summer, but where to look? Well start with the stunning Pinots from Germany and Northern Italy- there is one of each listed below.  Beaujolais may be struggling to regain the reputation it once had, but that is usually when they start making their best wines- a simple Beaujolais villages , served cool, in the garden with lunch or a light dinner makes for a perfect summer evening.

Sherry, Sherry,Sherry. Did I mention Sherry? It may still have its detractors, but its (fanatical) followers are getting louder and louder. Fino or Manzanilla, well chilled, with some straight-forward nibbles – olives, cured meats etc.  – is a match made in winey heaven.

ely wines for summer 2014:

Paparuda Pinot Noir, Timisoara, Romania 2012

Raphael Palacios ‘Bolo’ Godello, Valdeorras, Spain 2013

Wagner Stempel Riesling, Rheinhessen, Germany 2013

Franz Haas Pinot Nero, Alto-Adige, Italy 2010

Nyetimber English 2009 Classic Cuvee

Domaine Decelle-Villa Cote de Brouilly, Burgundy, France 2012

Cullen Sauvignon Blanc Semillon ‘Mangan Vineyard’, Margaret River, Western Australia 2011

G.D. Vajra Dolcetto d’Alba, Langhe, Piemonte 2012

Domaine Felines Jourdan Picpoul de Pinet, Coteaux du Languedoc 2013

Taittinger Champagne NV, France

Broglia la Meirana Gavi di Gavi, Italy 2013

Les Deux Cols ‘Cuvee Alize’ Cotes du Rhone, France 2012

Lucien Crochet ‘Le Chene’ Sancerre 2012

Domaine de Millet rosé Cotes de Gascogne 2013

Wagner Stempel Spätburgunder, Rheinhessen, Germany 2012

Hernando y Souridais ‘Antidoto’ Ribera del Duero, Spain 2011

Meursault ‘Les Vireuils’ Domaine Chavy-Chouet 2010

Domaine de la Janasse Chateauneuf-du-Pape 2009

Join us for an ely wine tasting evening and learn more about wines.

Each week a guest speaker will present a selection of wines from the given region and we’ll serve up a supper dish to match. All wine tastings take place at ely bar & brasserie and start at 7pm. See more at http://www.elywinebar.ie/about/wine-apreciation/ely-wine-tastings

 

tips, tipples & table talk – Week 9

What a week we’ve been having eh? This week’s tips, tipples & table talk is all about the topic that, right now, is #1… The sun. We’ve got an awesome frozen cocktail recipe for you to get drinking trying and a surprisingly easy to make beef carpaccio recipe – perfect for that alfresco dinner party. We also discuss how to handle working in an office, with business as normal, despite the hot and humid temperatures out there!

Oh AND to celebrate the sunny weather, we’re offering 10% back to our lovely ely customers all summer when you use your ely loyalty card. Don’t have one yet? Sign up here

Enjoy the weather everyone!

Table Talk of the Week: 7 Ways To Survive the Office in the Summer

Does your desk face the window? Colleagues’ holiday pics getting you down? Lack of air conditioning in the office getting you all hot and bothered? Let’s face it, the office is the last place that any of you want to be on a hot summer’s day. The weather is rarely this good in Ireland, and us Dubliners are finding that procrastination is taking over and work agendas are being pushed aside for daydreams of sun, surf and sand. However, it is business as normal unfortunately, so we’ve put together a few tips on how you can make the most out of being in the office and away from the summer sun.

beach-office

  1. Stay Hydrated – Might sound obvious but we often drink the same amount of water that we would on a normal work day but in the heat, we need much more. Dehydration can cause you to lose concentration (and lust after that post-work cold one), so drinking lots of water throughout the day is important to make sure you stay focused.
  2. Casual Wednesdays – You might already have casual Fridays in place in your office but what about offering (or asking for) casual Wednesdays? The mid-week break, away from office attire and into light, bright and breezy summer clothing, might just be the humpday help that you need!
  3. Flowers In the Window – Why not go green and bring in a couple of plants/flowers for your desk or office? The colours, scents (not too strong now!) and seeing nature in a work environment might help to lighten the atmosphere and brighten spirits.
  4. Swap the Coffee Break for an Ice Cream Run – Instead of going out to get your usual caffeine fix, why not get a selection of ice creams for the office. Random acts of kindness go down a treat in a hot and stuffy office environment, especially when you are quite literally, bringing treats.
  5. Eat a Summery Lunch – Light and summery foods like grilled chicken, fresh seafood, ripe tomatoes, garden salads all have an effect on your body and eating poorly isn’t going to help your mood when you’re craving freedom from the office. Places, like ely, that offer fresh, summery and seasonal lunch will make you feel ten times better when you eventually have to return to the desk.
  6. Leave the Car at Home – If you normally drive into work but live somewhere within an easy commute, why not take the bus or train into work, get off one stop earlier and stroll to the office. Or, if you’ve been meaning to get some more exercise, take this oppourtunity to walk or cycle to and from work, taking in some of the open air while this good weather lasts.
  7. Post-work Socialising – When you do get through the day at work, what better way to get over the office air-con squabbles, deadlines that kept you in work much longer than expected and unproductive hours, than to round up your colleagues (and the company credit card,  if they’ll let you!) and head for some after work socialising. Work won’t be as bad the next day when you’ve all got something to laugh about from the evening before!

This summer, groups of 6 or more can enjoy complimentary mixed bar platters at ely bar & brasserie, IFSC. Advance booking required.

dublin heatwave office collage


Taste Tip of the Week: Beef Carpaccio 

A fantastic starter for your summer dinner party, a lunch alfresco snack or simply a delicious accompaniment to a good glass of wine. At ely, we use organic Burren beef from the ely family farm but your local butcher should be able to provide you with a very good piece of fillet. Loaded with flavour, beef carpaccio always offers thin little slices of  heaven.

What you need:

  • 400g beef fillet
  • ½ tsp black peppercorns
  • 2 tbsp honey
  • 50g brown sugar
  • 25ml port wine
  • 25ml brandy
  • rock salt and black pepper
  • 4 tbsp extra virgin olive oil
  • juice of 1 lemon

ely beef carpaccioHow to do it:

  • Place the meat in a sealed container in the fridge for 2-4 hours.
  • Meanwhile, place the black peppercorns in a food processor and blitz, or grind up in a pestle and mortar.
  • Remove the meat from the fridge and rub the pepper mix into the flesh, coating thoroughly.
  • Place the honey, sugar, port and brandy in a bowl and mix well. Pour this mix over the spiced
  • meat. Cover and refrigerate overnight.
  • Remove from the fridge the next day, wrap tightly in clingfilm and freeze for 1 hour (this will
  • make it easy to slice the meat very thinly). Cut the meat into slices about 1-2mm thick.
  • Season with salt and pepper, then brush with olive oil and lemon juice
  • Serve with Parmesan shavings and crusty bread (optional).

Enjoy a complimentary plate of organic smoked meats when you order a bottle of wine* at ely wine bar, 22 Ely Place. *Available with any bottle of wine over €30.

organic smoked meats and wine

Tipple of the Week: Frozen Watermelon Margarita 

Ice cold, slushy and seriously refreshing. Cool down this summer with this delicious cocktail recipe using fresh pieces of watermelon. Sweet? Totally.

What you need:

  • 5 cups of watermelon, cubed, seeds with rind removed.
  • 1 cup Tequila
  • 1/2 cup Cointreau or Triple Sec
  • 1/2 cup fresh lime juice
  • 1/4 cup sugar
  • Watermelon slices (optional), for garnish

How to do it:

  • Place chopped watermelon in an airtight container and freeze overnight.
  • Put the frozen watermelon and remaining ingredients into a blender, and blend until smooth.
  • Pour into margarita glasses and garnish with a wedge of watermelon.
  • Drink and enjoy.

Got a cocktail in mind? We can make anything you crave (within reason!) at ely bar & brasserie, IFSC.

photon 3

tips, tipples & table talk – Week 8

What to get the wine or beer lover in your life that has everything? An ely gift card of course! Joking aside, we’ve got some awesome quick and easy DIY gift ideas you can make at home. While we’ve been blessed with sunshine recently, we’ve highlighted a few of the things to do in Dublin when it rains (which it still does, quite a bit). This week’s tips, tipples and table talk also looks at the, now controversial, Poolbeg chimneys of Dublin’s skyline and we get a little bit cheesy with our how-to-guide to serving the perfect cheeseboard.

Travel Tip of the Week: What To Do in Dublin When It Rains

Good aul Irish summers eyh? While the weather has been relatively good of late, us Dubliners have certainly noticed the humidity in the air and with that, the heavy rainfall. When it rains it pours and yes, while we would always advise popping into any of our 3 ely venues, hiding out from the rain and letting us pour you a little glass of wine or craft beer, if you find yourself as a visitor to Dublin during one of these spells or just feel like enjoying your city, don’t worry. We’ve compiled a short list of awesome things to do in Dublin, come hail or high water!

  1. Visit the Little Museum of Dublin. Right in the heart of the city, this little museum is a must visit. Located on 15 St. Stephen’s Green, Dublin 2, the Little Museum of Dublin embraces and collects the fun, cute and quirky things that make this fair city brilliant. Super knowledgeable and always eager to know more, their guides tell you true Dubliner stories in a fun and informal manner.
  2. Visit the Science Gallery. With some really cool exhibitions, this is no nerdy spot! Continuously changing, challenging and altering our perception of the normal, this interactive attraction in Trinity College is always fun. The Science Gallery offers events, talks, debates and workshops, giving guests a chance to get involved.
  3. Go vintage clothes shopping. Dublin’s vintage clothing selection is always getting bigger and better and what a good way to spend a rainy day by getting lost in the days of old. Siopaella in Temple Bar, Om Diva on Drury Street and The Harlequin, 13 Castle Market are all close enough to land yourselves triple the amount of bargains in just one trip to the city.
  4. Visit the RHA Gallery. The 184th Annual exhibition runs at the RHA on Ely Place until the 17th August so plenty of time to check out some of the works at Ireland’s largest open submission exhibition. With 567 works by 354 artists, a trip to this fantastic gallery is an ideal way to while away a rainy afternoon.
  5. Relax and unwine-d at an ely wine tasting. Good company combined with wine, food and fun at an ely wine tasting is a nice relaxed yet educational way to spend a rainy evening. Held every fortnight, each with a different theme, the full list of upcoming ely wine tasting evenings can be found here.

rainy day in dublin

Taste Tip of the Week: Say Cheese

“Age is of no importance, unless you are a wine or a cheese.” 

Cheese is perfect for a formal dinner party or equally, for a casual night in with friends, and needs very little preparation.

When you’re putting together a cheeseboard, try to buy where you can taste; your eyes will never tell you as much as your taste buds will. The general idea is to serve a selection of cheeses which will offer you and your guests contrasting flavours and textures.

Our ideal mix would be:

  • A nice soft cheese
  • Blue cheese
  • A hard cheese
  • A washed rind cheese (they’re the smelly ones with the pinkish rinds),
  • If possible, a sheep’s or goat’s milk cheese.

But remember, it’s better to have one ripe and gorgeous cheese than five mediocre pieces.

IMG_5943

After you buy your cheese, be sure to look after it. Cheese is a living, breathing food and needs to be treated with some care to get the best from it. This is particularly true of the softer cheeses. Cheese should always be served at room temperature because serving it cold substantially inhibits the flavour.

Fridges aren’t as bad for cheese as they are sometimes made out to be. The main problem is their dry atmosphere rather than the cold temperature. If you do store your cheese in the fridge, always remove it several hours before serving and make sure your cheese is well wrapped in a breathable covering eg. wax paper.

There are no set rules for the serving time of your cheeses; some people like to have their cheese before dessert and others prefer it after, or instead of, dessert. It’s always good to serve something with the cheese which acts against any richness and clean the palate between cheeses. Fruit is really good for this or if you don’t have any to hand, serving with a chutney or fruit jelly will do.

Enjoy a great glass of wine and a cheeseboard, at ely wine bar.

ely winebar cheese board

Tipple Tip of the Week: DIY Gift Ideas

Do you ever struggle with what gift to get the beer or wine lover in your life? They’ve already got a whole shelf of Riedel, Tipperary or Waterford Crystal wine glasses. The over sized German beer-stein glass has had its fun. When that occasion does come around, this time why not make something yourself?

Heartfelt, personal and usually low cost and simple – As Blue Peter would say, here’s one we made earlier:

Step one, drink wine and craft beer. Not a problem? We thought so. Step two, keep and collect all the bottle caps and corks. We are trying it keep it low cost though, so another idea is to get down to any of the three ely venues (or another good bar) who would be more than happy to give you their excess bottle caps after a night’s shift. Wine corks might be that little bit more difficult to source, but a good wine bar should have a few in stock, otherwise you can buy corks in bulk for relatively low cost online.

You’d be surprised by what you can make – everything from coasters and posters to magnets, picture frames and trays.

See how to make bottle cap gifts here and wine cork gifts here.

Wine corks bottle caps DIY

Table Talk of the Week: The Poolbeg Chimneys – Should They Stay or Should They Go?

The suggestion from ESB that the resources needed to maintain the unused Poolbeg Chimneys could be better spent elsewhere caused some controversy among Dubliners this week. The red and white towers have stood at the Poolbeg area of Dublin Bay since the 1970s and have raised the demand that these chimneys be protected. With many, both domestic and foreign, voices saying that they are an iconic part of the Dublin skyline, others argue that the towers are an “eye sore”, agreeing that the resources to keep them there could indeed be better spent elsewhere.

This is a topic that pretty much all Dubliners will have an opinion on, there is no smoke without fire (as they say), and no doubt will be very keen to share it. At ely, we love them – those red and white striped chimneys are one of the few genuine icons of the Dublin skyline. They are the first thing you see of Dublin when you fly home, or the last bit of Dublin you see before you leave. They are like two ever-present sentries standing guard over our city. Where some might see ugly, we see a certain “industrial charm”.

ESB say that a decision would be made on the future of the Poolbeg chimneys by the end of this year [2014]. Demolition is among the options being considered.

See a collection of images, memories and feelings about Poolbeg chimneys via thejournal.ie here.

10655905965_bb2bff577d_b-630x420

 

ely wines for Summer #009

In celebrating Bastille Day (week) we have chosen a couple of French classics for this week! We appreciate that these are at the higher end of the price spectrum, but they are an absolute treat!

Meursault ‘Les Vireuils’ Domaine Chavy-Chouet 2010

chavy-chouet
Romaric Chavy is the 7th generation of his family to run this winery. Their vineyards are evenly divided between Meursault and Puligny Montrachet with holdings in many of the finest vineyards in both. Romaric has a clear vision of the style of wines he wants to produce, with the emphasis on freshness rather than creaminess, and minerality over oak. As a result, the wines see only 25-30% new oak, and minimum battonage. The 2010 ‘Les Vireuils’ is a perfect example of his vision- the nose is subtle yet complex, with aromas of white flower and citrus. The influence of the oak only becomes apparent on the palate, not as a flavour but as texture, rounding out the lemon-fresh streak. As the wine opens, the inherent richness of Meursault becomes more apparent, but never overcomes the precision and finesse of this superb wine. Just try to drink it slowly.

With food… Go all out and have a bottle of this with the amazing seafood platter in ely Winebar. Lobster- check… Dingle Bay brown crab.. check.. Carlingford oysters, prawn cocktail, tempura squid and much more.

 

Domaine de la Janasse Chateauneuf-du-Pape 2009

Chateauneuf-du-Pape
Chateauneuf-du-Pape might not strike you as a summer wine, and in most cases you’d probably be right. In fact, it’s a wine that many of us associate with winter, or even Christmas. But that doesn’t have to be the case. While some Chateauneuf is big and burly- all power and strength – there are some which are much more refined. Janasse is one of the latter. Put simply, it reminds us of why Chateauneuf-du-Pape is held in such high esteem. A blend of 80% Grenache with 10% each of Syrah and Mourvédre, its defining characteristics are elegance, purity and concentration. There are more famous names and more expensive wines produced in this region, but none match Janasse for quality, consistency and value.

With food…. Just keep it simple. Have some organic Burren beef from our family farm. A 28 day dry-aged fillet with mushroom wellington and horseradish mash in ely Bar & Brasserie should do the trick!

Check out the 8 previous parts of ely wines for Summer 2014:

ely wines for Summer #001

ely wines for Summer #002

ely wines for Summer #003

ely wines for Summer #004

ely wines for Summer #005

ely wines for Summer #006

ely wines for Summer #007

ely wines for Summer #008

Join us for an ely wine tasting evening and learn more about wines.
Each week a guest speaker will present a selection of wines from the given region and we’ll serve up a supper dish to match. All wine tastings take place at ely bar & brasserie and start at 7pm. See more at http://www.elywinebar.ie/about/wine-apreciation/ely-wine-tastings

tips, tipples & table talk – Week 7

In this week’s tips, tipples & table talk we reminisce about the fruit & veg wars we had at home when we were younger – and how those who still feel the same can tackle the problem today. We also look through the glass and discuss how you can make an average wine taste better and our what’s on this week includes babies carrying watermelons, fire breathers in Dublin city centre and 1970’s aristocratic Ireland.

Tipple tip of the Week: Through the Looking Glass – Why that wine glass really matters.

In our opinion, Riedel has perfected the art of making the right glass for the right wine. However, that said, you don’t need to spend a fortune on wine glasses for use at home. Here are some quick tips in choosing a glass for your wine.

Hang on, does it actually matter?

Yes it does! Did you know that you can turn a great wine into an average wine by serving it in the wrong glass – and make an average wine taste better by using the correct glass. Curiouser and curiouser, as Alice would say.

Hmmmm, tell me more.

The bottom of the glass should be bowl-shaped, with the rim of the glass sloping inwards to capture and concentrate the aromas.
The bowl of the glass should be wider for red wines, which benefits from a little swirling around. On that swirling note, a good solid stem is always always important, nobody wants a broken glass! A more subtle light and delicate white wine will concentrate better in a tall glass with a tapered rim. Always use a tall, slim flute glass for your sparkling wine and champagne. This will keep the bubbles flowing and help keep its sparkle!

In an ideal world, we’d all wash our wine glasses by hand but we know as well as you do that this quite tedious. Most good glassware is dishwasher safe, just make sure to check before purchasing (or before you pop it in the dishwasher!).

More on ely’s wine appreciation classes here.

_MG_8930

Taste tip(s) of the Week: How to Eat Healthier – Even when you hate fruit & veg

We remember it like it was yesterday. Seven years old and sitting at the dinner table having a stand off with the ‘rents. Surely, they have to give in first. Surely, they couldn’t leave me to starve? Surely, if I could just get them to look away for a minute I can easily hide them in my lap. Or in my pocket. Or maybe in my Velcro runners. Give peas a chance? Not a hope. This was full blown veggie war, with only one winner.

Now-a-days, while we’ve out grown out of table tantrums, there are still many of  you who are just plain adverse to certain (or many!) fruits and vegetables. You know the advantages, you know it’s good for you and you know you should be eating more of it, but sometimes… y’ just don’t want to. Our taste tip of the week, here are a few easy ways to include more fruit and vegetables into your diet.

  1. Replace today’s soft drink or coffee for fruit juice – There are now some top class juice joints in Dublin city, Staple Foods and Green Beards Juicery to name only a few, so why not replace your sugary soft drink or coffee at least once a week with some fresh fruity goodness. Alternatively, head to the fruit aisle, grab a blender and make some yourself at home.
  2. Add a new vegetable to your regular meals – Take a staple dish that you love, like pizza or pasta, and try to add a different vegetable to it, at least once a week. Whether it’s adding peppers to your usual margherita pizza or mushrooms to your creamy chicken sauce, why not be brave and try it. 9 times out of 10 you’ll find you might actually like the flavour.
  3. Replace dessert with sweet fruits  If you’re used to eating something sweet after every meal, try sweet fruits like mangoes or strawberries for dessert instead. Similarly, frozen yoghurt with fresh berries, is basically ice cream… right? As featured on our blog a few weeks back, you can check out the recipe here.
  4. Dunk ’em & stuff ’em Like breads and crisps, sliced vegetables like carrots and celery also taste great dipped into humous or a (light) sour cream dip. Peppers, tomatoes and mushrooms can all be stuffed with pesto, cheeses and more, not only complimenting but enhancing the flavours.
  5. Vegucate yourself – Sure, we all know that fruit and vegetables are good for us but how many of us actually know the specifics? Particular fruits can help with everything from anxiety to acne and certain vegetables can cure ailments along with boosting energy, endorphins, stamina and much more. Read up, vegucate yourself and maybe it’ll tempt you to try something new.

Try new healthy, seasonal summer menus at ely wine bar.

fruit and veg collage

What’s on this Week

A big one on Merrion Square this weekend folks and so much happening at this year’s Laya Healthcare’s City Spectacular, formerly the Street Performance World Championship. The very best in family fun and entertainment, the event itself will be held July 11th – 13th but will also spread across Dublin city with concerts, family picnics, artisan food events and outdoor screenings until July 27th. The event map can be enlarged by clicking the image below and the full Dublin line up can be found here.

Just up the road from Merrion Square, ely wine bar, 22 Ely Place is open for Saturday lunch + dinner. 

laya map 2

The hugely popular Dirty Dancing: The Classic Story On Stage was put in the corner (of Grand Canal Square) last night and will run until the 26th July at The Bord Gais Energy Theatre. Featuring all the best bits from the film and more, this fantastic show still has some tickets left and can be purchased here.

Book pre-theatre at ely gastro bar, Grand Canal Square.

DD-Dub_HmPg_576x3001

One of Brian Friel’s finest plays, The Aristocrats, runs in The Abbey Theatre until August 2nd. A moving drama about a wealthy Catholic family in 1970’s Ireland, it surprisingly relates extremely well to current and modern times. With a fine cast executing Friel’s fantastic script with haunting undertones, this play is a must see for any theatre lover. Tickets are still available, to purchase click here.

Enjoy pre-theatre dining at ely bar & brasserie, IFSC.

brian friel

 

ely wines for Summer #008

This week we’ve decided to just go all out with the reds- sure we all love a glass (or two) of white on a beautiful day, but just because it’s sunny shouldn’t mean you neglect your reds. After all, you probably rely on them throughout the rest of the year!

Wagner Stempel Spätburgunder, Rheinhessen, Germany 2012

ely_wine_bar_Wagner_StempelA GERMAN RED WINE! Yes, those Germans just keep surprising us… While everyone in the wine business can- and will- wax lyrical about those amazing German Rieslings, Spätburgunder doesn’t get quite the same attention. Hopefully that’s all about to change. First things first- Spätburgunder is Pinot Noir. The name may not be quite as sexy, but this is Germany, and they don’t really do sexy names. But they do make damn sexy wines! German Pinot (or Spätburgunder) tends to be quite light in colour, but with wonderfully intense flavours and incredible finesse. This wine, from the fantastic Wagner-Stempel winery encapsulates all that is great about Pinot as a variety, and Germany as a wine producer- delicate but beautifully flavoured, with raspberry, cherry and redcurrant flavours. It is softly perfumed, silky textured and utterly delicious. Do yourself a favour and try this wine. Not only will you forgive the unsexy name, you may even come to love it!

Food… Pinot Noir is wonderfully versatile, and the German ones especially so. Duck, game, lamb are all fantastic, as are many fish and white meats. Try this with the organic Burren pork sharing plate in ely gastro bar.

 

Hernando y Souridais ‘Antidoto’ Ribera del Duero, Spain 2011

antidotoRibero del Duero would probably not be the first choice when thinking of wines for a summer evening, but then this is not your typical Ribera. A joint venture between and local winery administrator (Hernando!) and a winemaker from the Loire Valley (Souridais), Antidodo shows how this region is capable of producing wines of incredible finesse. From the gentle extraction, to fermentation in concrete and aging in 2/3 year old French barriques (from Ch. Haut-Brion no less) everything about the winemaking is geared towards elegance. From the dark berry and tobacco nose, hints of pepper and earthiness on the palate and followed by a long, minerally finish, this wine just oozes class. If you are bored with wines which are over-extracted and overly oaked, then this surely is your Antidote!

Food…. Lamb is a classic, as is Beef. But the delicacy of this wines is best suited to the best cuts of the finest meats. Try the rack of ‘Craggy Island’ organic Burren lamb in ely wine bar, ely place.

 

Check out ely wines for Summer 2014:

ely wines for Summer #001

ely wines for Summer #002

ely wines for Summer #003

ely wines for Summer #004

ely wines for Summer #005

ely wines for Summer #006

ely wines for Summer #007

ely wines for Summer #008

Join us for an ely wine tasting evening and learn more about wines.
Each week a guest speaker will present a selection of wines from the given region and we’ll serve up a supper dish to match. All wine tastings take place at ely bar & brasserie and start at 7pm. See more at http://www.elywinebar.ie/about/wine-apreciation/ely-wine-tastings

%d bloggers like this: