The 15 Series, Week 2: 15 Things To Do In Dublin Before December

ely restaurants celebrates its 15th birthday this year and each week, The 15 Series brings you 15 tips on topics such as food, wine, culture, lifestyle, craft beer and more!

#ely15years

 

15 Things To Do In Dublin Before December

The lead up to the festive season can be chilly, wet, dull and grey. Some have Halloween, pumpkins and dressing up to look forward to, while others might decide to have a dry November in anticipation of the busy festive season ahead, or take up a hobby they mightn’t have had time for during the summer months. There are plenty of amazing things happening in Dublin in the weeks leading up to December, so we’ve put together 15 for your bucket list.

1. Get Stoked For Bram
Bram Stoker
Photo credit: http://www.bramstokerfestival.com

There are a million and one things going on for this year’s Bram Stoker Festival, we reckon you won’t need to do anything else for the rest of the month after it! From vamp-wiring (yes, that’s city centre zip lining) to sinister screenings, gothic markets, karaoke to to all things ghoulish for the kids, there’s something for every man, woman, child and vampire this 24 – 27 October.

Enjoy at glass of blood red and a fang’s bite of rare organic steak at ely wine bar, 22 Ely Place, Dublin 2


2. A Photo Speaks A Thousand Words
World press photo exhibition
Photo credit: http://www.worldpressphoto.ie

The awe-inspiring World Press Photo exhibition returns to The chq Building this Friday 17 October and runs right up until 15 November. If you didn’t catch it last year, now’s your chance to check out a showcase of some of the best photojournalism in the world. Prepare to be moved.

Enjoy lunch at ely bar & brasserie, beside the exhibition in The chq Building, IFSC, Dublin 1


3. Art Comes Alive

NGI Plays presents sixteen short plays inspired by National Gallery paintings on Saturday 22 November and 29 November 2014. Sixteen 10-minute plays inspired by paintings in the National Gallery of Ireland have been created, over two years, by five Irish playwrights and will be beautifully performed by actors from the Umbrella Theatre company.

Enjoy early-bird menus from 5pm, Mon – Sat at ely wine bar, 22 Ely Place, Dublin 2.


4.  Book It In

As the clever Kitten Soft tv advert states, “Paper has a big future”. Meet authors, editors, publishers and head down, bookmark in hand, to the Smock Alley Theatre for the Dublin Book Festival, 13 – 16 November. Perfect for families, book lovers and fans of poetry & prose, we’re looking forward to the return this vibrant festival,  which has been running since 2005.


5. Run Dublin, Run

No better way to spend a bank holiday Monday than to enjoy a little bit of fresh Dublin air at the annual Dublin Marathon, taking place on Monday 27 October. For those of you who have been training, a very well done, to those who haven’t had the time to train, fear not! Walkers are accepted and welcomed.


6. Explore The Unknown Rhône 
rhone wine

Photo credit: ely restaurants

Rhône Wine Week Ireland is a celebration of the wines of the Rhône Valley, with events all over the city, from 3 – 8 November. From Rhône dinners, Q&A’s with Rhône experts and wine makers, to the Big Rhône Quiz, there’s lots to love about this South of France wine celebration.

Fans of the ely Big Tasting will love the Big Rhone Tasting, Thursday 6 November at ely bar & brasserie, IFSC, Dublin 1.


7.  That’ll Do Donkey, That’ll Do

Based on the hit films, Shrek The Musical promises to bring all the much-loved characters to life, live on stage, in an “all-singing, all-dancing extravaganza” at the Bord Gais Energy Theatre on 21 Oct – 9 November.  The onstage version is sure to provide a lot of laughs between the green swamp-dwelling ogre and his cheeky donkey sidekick.

Enjoy pre-theatre dining from 5pm at ely gastro bar, Grand Canal Square, Dublin 2.


8.  Smashing Science

Three Smashing Science films will screen at the Chq Building on 13 – 15 November as part of science week. Along with a film, each evening will also include discussion with leading scientists and thinkers. Brought to you by Insight, AMBER, UCD Science Expression and Happenings, the evening promises films, science, beers and discussions – a winning combination.

Enjoy an all new bar menu, craft beers and an extensive wine list at ely bar & brasserie, in The chq Building, IFSC, Dublin 1


9.  Let’s Dance

Think pink and dance like everybody’s watching for a fantastic cause this 29 November at the Convention Centre Dublin. Strictly Against Breast Cancer returns to Dublin with even more glitz, glamour and dancing than ever. Some great personalities will be partnered with supporters and survivors and this black tie event offers a fun night out, while helping a very worthy cause.

Enjoy pre-event signature cocktails at ely bar & brasserie, in The chq Building, IFSC, Dublin 1


10. Love The Wine You’re With
wine and cheese tasting

Photo credit: ely restaurants

Many people just assume that cheese and wine go together, but that’s not always the case. Some cheeses ruin a good wine, and vice versa. But, there are some outstanding wine and cheese pairings and at the ely Wine & Cheese Tasting, Thursday 30 October, we will get a better understanding of what wines work with cheese and why, while most importantly enjoying them!

Limited tickets available for the ely Wine & Cheese Tasting. To book, click here


11. Don’t Let The Days Go To Waste

When you first read about the upcoming Abbey Theatre production The Waste Ground Party, you are greeted by the words “This area has gone to the f***ing dogs”. This intriguing intro, in our opinion, just reiterates the fact that this exciting new play from Shaun Dunne is definitely one to catch this 22 October – 29 November.

Enjoy pre-theatre dining at ely bar & brasserie, in The chq Building, Dublin 1 – corporate ambassador of The Abbey Theatre.


12. Run In Dublin’s Darkness

Mark Pollock is one of the world’s most inspiring and amazing athletes and this year’s Lifestyle Sports Run in the Dark plays a massive part in funding the Mark Pollock Trust’s mission to find a fast track cure for paralysis. You can play your part by lighting up Dublin’s darkness and running 5k or 10k on 12 November.


13.  Gonna Make A Change

Marking the 5th anniversary of the King of Pops’ passing, Anthony Walker premieres The Man In The Mirror – A live tribute to the music of Michael Jackson at the Olympia Theatre, Saturday 1 November. With a 5 piece live backing band, 4 backing singers and 6 piece dance troupe, MJ will really come to life in Dublin, for one night only.


14. Shoulder To Shoulder 

Whether you’re one of the lucky 150,000+ ticket holders or simply prefer watching from your sofa or at the bar, there are 3 big Irish rugby dates to enjoy in the run up to December. The 2014 Guinness Series kicks off at the Aviva Stadium on 8, 16, 22 November as the nation comes together for this year’s autumn internationals to cheer on the boys in green.

Enjoy a post match feed, featuring organic Burren steak from the ely family farm at ely wine bar, 22 Ely Place, Dublin 2.


15. It’s Beginning To Look Alot Like…

In the week before December, the RDS will transform into a Christmas wonderland filled with food, wine, crafts, gifts and more. Get ready for the month ahead at the Food & Wine Magazine Christmas Show, 21 – 23 November. This year’s show promises so much red and gold festive goodness it’s sure to knock the bah humbug out of any skeptic.

Enjoy the run up to the festive season at ely wine bar, 22 Ely Place, Dublin 2 – Awarded ‘Best Wine Experience in Ireland’ by Food & Wine Magazine, August 2014.

The 15 Series, Week 1: 15 Essential Autumn Foods

ely restaurants celebrates its 15th birthday this year and each week, The 15 Series brings you 15 tips on topics such as food, wine, culture, lifestyle, craft beer and more!
#ely15years

 

15 Essential Autumn Foods You Should Enjoy

As the days slowly shorten and the sun plays harder to get, our appetites begin to change, too. Where just weeks before, it seemed natural to toss a salad together on a whim, now our thoughts turn to a bowl of soup, or a comforting casserole. Here are our tips on some of the foods you should be making the most of this autumn.

1. Pump Up The Jam
Photo credit: http://www.flynnsfreshveg.com

Get to a hedge and grab a handful because this time of the year is the best for blackberry picking! Their warming sweet taste can be enjoyed well into the winter months by making jams, chutneys, freezing for later use as youghurt and dessert toppings and work beautifully in berry mojitos and martinis.

2. An Apple A Day

Apples ripen anytime between the end of august and October. Commonly used this time of the year in pies and purées, you’ll also meet many of these cider apples when they leave the orchard and end up on your bar table in bottle form.

3. Crave and Carve
rtepumpkin

Photo credit: http://www.rte.ie

 Not quite there with the scale of obsession that the USA have with pumpkin flavoured everything this time of the year but nonetheless, we’ve embraced their ever popular pumpkin spice lattes with open arms. These colder days cry out for a bowl of hearty pumpkin soup and a wee sprinkle of cinnamon and ginger really enhances the taste.

4.  What A Pear

Now, poached pears may remind you of your granny but the juiciest of pears are plentiful and seriously tasty at this time of the year. Moving away from the citrus and tropical fruits of summer, poached pears with blue cheese or sliced pear with walnuts make a great addition to any salad.

5. Seasonal Seafood
ely hq halibut&beetroot gratin

Photo credit: ely restaurants

 Halibut is native to Irish waters and comes into season this time of the year. Its mildly sweet meat is delicious but dries out and cooks very quickly. Season the fish after it’s cooked as if you do so before seasoning, it’ll dry out. Lightly drizzle olive oil and lemon juice over fish and roasted autumn veg.

6. An Alternative Root

Many of us are familiar with beetroot, enjoying it pickled, raw, roasted and in soups, but did you know that the leaves are edible too? Extremely good for you, why not think about adding these to omelettes, salads and juices like you would with spinach or kale?

7.  Not So Offal 
ely kidney&mushroom pie

Photo credit: ely restaurants

Offal is a much misrepresented ingredient. Whether it’s lamb sweetbreads, oxtail soup or a wonderfully assembled in a rich sauce with wild mushrooms and flaky pastry (a la kidney and mushroom pie) there’s a, not so, offal dish for everyone to enjoy this season.

8.  Go Green

Photo credit: ely restaurants

This time of the year, you might be surprised to come across some green tomatoes, but don’t be alarmed! These last late ripening tomatoes left on the vine can still be enjoyed. The most common and delicious way is frying them up but these little green guys can also be used in salsas, relishes, chutneys and soups.

9.  Figuring It Out
Figs 367098

Photo credit: http://www.bbc.co.uk

The sweet honey taste of this fruit makes it a wonderful and popular pairing with pork and cured meats. Figs also work beautifully with rich desserts, fuller salads ans warm aromatic spices.

10. Not Just For Rainy Days And Tuesdays
ely pancakes

Photo credit: ely restaurants

Now, hear us out. Not necessarily an Autumn staple, and some of you may have over indulged on Pancake Tuesday (enough to have had your fill for one year) but the mouthwatering taste of maple syrup really does slide into our minds and our mouths with the change of the season.

11. Sweet Spuds

In the land of the traditional Irish potato, it’s hard to see how any other spud could ever make its way into our hearts. However, this creamy and sweet, healthier alternative is now featured almost everywhere. If you ever hear our friends from across the Atlantic calling out for “Yams” around Thanksgiving, these are those!

12. Toasty Nuts

Toasted, roasted and quickly devoured. Autumn’s hazelnuts add indulgence to any chocolate dessert but we’re also guilty of packing some into a sandwich bag for snacking on the go!

13.  Goldilocks And The Three Bears
rhubarb fool - ely

Photo credit: ely restaurants

Summer (at times) may have seemed too hot. Winter (most times!) can seem too cold. Many agree that the Autumn temperature in Ireland is just right. Light breakfast snacks give way to the blonde and her bears’ favourite dish. There’s nothing quite like the warm familiar taste and smell of porridge in the mornings.

14. Ireland’s Famous Fungi

And no, we’re not talking about the famous fun loving Dolphin, we sense that the Kingdom might not be too pleased about that! Autumn in Ireland brings foragers from all over Europe to try their hand at finding some of the season’s delicious and gourmet wild mushrooms. Be careful though, always go with a guide and if you do decide to go out to the woods today, you may be in for a surprise. Some poisonous species may just be mistaken for edible delights.

15. Cheater’s Cuppa
tea poster A3 final

Photo credit: ely restaurants

If we’re being smart about it then technically tea (leaf) is actually is a food. However, we’re know we’re cheating slightly with this last one. Iced coffees, smoothies and juices from summer just cannot compare to this nice warm, put-your-feet-up-after-a-long-cold-autumn’s-day delight. In fact, we’ve just popped the kettle on as we type this!

tips, tipples & table talk – Week 17

This week’s tips, tipples & table talk  is all about the beautiful Burren. We fill you in on our 15th year anniversary trip to our family farm and let you almost imagine it, as if you were there, and could feel the country air. We also infuse Moroccan and Burren cuisine with a gorgeous lamb tagine recipe, perfect for these Autumn months and we discuss some wine phrases in an ely urban dictionary’d language you can understand.

Enjoy!

Tipple Tip(s) of the Week: Wine Phrases Without the Pretension

Have you ever had somebody describe wine and find yourself nodding along without a clue? More often than not, these terms means something very simple and we’ve picked a few of the ones that some people struggle with, in a language you can understand. There are wine bores, there are wine snobs and there are those – like you and I – that just like wine.Big tasting

  • Austere

They say: Wines that are austere are generally not terribly pleasant wines to drink. An austere wine is a hard, rather dry wine that lacks richness.

We say: An austere wine is not necessarily a negative one. This would be that seemingly stern and formal gent you get seated next to at a dinner party. The quiet type, but as the evening goes on, you start to realise that there’s a lot more to them and certainly, they’re more fun the more you get to know them. 

  • Barnyard

They say: An unclean, farmyard, fecal aroma that is imparted to a wine because of unclean barrels or unsanitary wine-making facilities.

We say: Well that sounds horrible! Old Burgundys and sometimes, old Rhones, can take on aromas that you might find in, say, a “recently” cleaned stable or perhaps by the carriages around Stephen’s Green. Thankfully this is a great example of how wines don’t always taste like they smell.

  • Bouquet:

They say: As a wine’s aroma becomes more developed from bottle aging, the aroma is transformed into a bouquet that is more than just the smell of the grape.

We say: Really… just a poncey word to describe the scent of a wine.

  • Tannic:

They say: The tannins of a wine, which are extracted from the grape skins and stems, are, along with a wine’s acidity and alcohol, its lifeline. Tannins give a wine firmness and some roughness when young, but gradually fall away and dissipate.

We say: Tannins are what give red wine its colour and dries out your mouth.. A tannic wine is also what’ll what give you away the morning after, with your black teeth and stained lips! 

  • Hot:

They say: Wines with alcohol levels in excess of 14.5% often taste hot if the requisite depth of fruit is not present.

We say: Feeling a little merrier than you expected you might at 6pm? A hot wine describes nothing to do with the temperature of the wine, but suggests that the alcohol levels in the wine are too high (yes, there is such a thing!).

  • Lush:

They say: Lush wines are soft, richly fruity wines that are both concentrated and fat. A lush wine can never be an astringent or hard wine.

We say: Not just a brand of natural cosmetics or  what a young British bloke might holler at a particularly good looking lady, a lush wine is rich, smooth, full, fruity, velvety. Highly desirable, a lush wine is basically the Jessica Rabbit of wines.

Learn more about wine at our BIGGEST wine tasting event of the year, ely’s Big Tasting on Friday 10th October, 2014 at ely bar & brasserie, IFSC.

the BIG tasting September 2011


Taste Tip of the Week: “Craggy Island” Lamb Tagine

There are a lot of ingredients in this recipe, but once you put a little bit of love into it, it’s really worth the effort. A Burren-Moroccan fusion dish and a nice alternative to the traditional Irish Stew.

What you need:

  • 800g–1kg lean lamb shoulder, diced (at ely, we use organic “Craggy Island” lamb)
  • plain flour, to coat lamb
  • extra virgin olive oil
  • 1 large Spanish onion
  • 1 each red and yellow peppers, diced
  • 2 large or 3 medium carrots, diced
  • 4 cloves garlic, crushed
  • 4 bay leaves
  • 1 sprig thyme, 1 sprig rosemary
  • 1 small, red chilli, dried or fresh
  • 2 cinnamon sticks
  • 10g fresh ginger, peeled and grated, or ½ tsp ground
  • 20g dried ground cumin
  • 100ml honey
  • 800g tinned chopped tomatoes or passata, or enough to submerge all ingredients
  • 1 aubergine
  • 1 courgette

Serves 6

Lamb Tagine Collage

How we do it:

  • Lightly coat the lamb in flour and brown in a little oil on a hot pan. You will need to do this in batches. Set aside and remove any excess fat.
  • In one large frying pan (or two, if necessary), fry the onion, peppers, carrots and garlic in some olive oil until they are soft.
  • Add the lamb, bay leaves and fresh herbs.
  • Now add the chilli, cinnamon sticks, ginger and cumin. Stir well to coat the lamb and vegetables.
  • Drizzle the honey over the lamb, then pour in the tomatoes or passata. Stir well.
  • Reduce the heat to a simmer and cook for 1-2 hours, stirring occasionally. Take off the heat and leave to cool.
  • Slowly reheat the tagine when you are ready to serve.
  • Chop the aubergine and courgette into large chunks, fry in some olive oil and add to the tagine. Doing this last prevents the aubergine
    and courgette from being discoloured by the sauce.
  • Serve with couscous (see note for the cook).

A note for the cook:

  • This delicious lamb tagine tastes even better the day after cooking, when the flavours have had a chance to blend and settle.
  • It’s best served with couscous. Rub oil into the couscous (before cooking) to prevent it sticking together.
  • Mix equal quantities of hot stock and couscous, cover with cling film and leave for 5 minutes.
  • Remove the cling film and run a fork through the couscous to separate.
  • Season, add some fresh mint, and serve.

Enjoy grass fed, organic “Craggy Island” lamb, sourced through our family farm in the Burren, Co. Clare at ely wine bar, 22 Ely Place.

craggy island lamb


Table Talk of the Week: ely’s Farm Trip to the Burren, Co. Clare 

On Tuesday 23rd September, to kick off ely’s 15th year celebrations, a gang of us slipped on our wellies, tucked our ponchos into our bags and headed out for a fun filled and insightful trip to the ely organic family farm in the Burren, Co. Clare.

The day started bright and early at 8am with the warming scent of homemade sausage rolls and brownies laid out for breakfast at ely bar & brasserie, IFSC. Fed, watered and one chorus of Irish mammy style “make sure you go to the restroom before we leave” later and we were off on the 3 hour luxury coach to Clare.

Our first stop found us outside of the coach and inside our TV boxes, at “Craggy Island Parochial House”. Father Ted’s house, the McCormacks’ organic farm, is where all of ely’s delicious organic lamb is reared. Cheryl McCormack, the lovely lady of the house, treated the gang to scrumptious home baking using only organic ingredients; scones, brown bread, home made jams made from their own fruit, organic tea and coffee, served in a welcoming home atmosphere. Patrick McCormack, the first speaker of the day, so eloquently recited the poem Lost” and discussed the simplicity and passion of a simple Burren farm life along with a much needed reminder, to always try to take a little “Burren time” for ourselves, in our fast paced and busy lives.

“Stand still. Stand still. The trees ahead and bushes beside you. Are not lost.” – David Wagoner

Outside Father Ted's

The beauty of farming in the Burren, Co. Clare lies in the fact that it has been farmed in the same fashion for 6,000 – 7,000 years. We then visited a site, which to the naked eye might have just seemed like grass, rock and shrubbery, but which was in fact the home to rare and unique Burren flora and fauna. Paula and Sharon from the Burren Life Project spoke to the group about the importance of Burren landscape preservation, the difficulties that organic Burren farming faces and the strict grazing methods being used to counteract these difficulties.

Group at Burren Life Project

Following this, in true Irish fashion, the clouds began to darken and the drizzle appeared. With a few rumbling tummies and rain jackets zipped up to the neck, we hopped back in to the coach and headed off to the home of Hugh and Isobel Robson, the organic ely family farm, for a much anticipated farm lunch.

Having worked up an appetite, we were in for a treat. What awaited us was a feast of Burren produce featuring organic Burren beef tongue with black truffles, organic porchetta rolled in local Burren herbs and succulent organic Burren rib, all from the ely family farm. We also enjoyed nori, dillisk and kombu smoked organic salmon from the Burren Smokehouse and homemade MOPE (Most Oppressed People Ever) potato cakes from the Burren Spud Project, all accompanied with salads, quiche, artisan Burren cheeses, ely’s homemade Guinness bread and 7-day pickled eggs. Deirdre from the Burren Spud project spoke about the importance of the humble potato in the global food crisis while Birgitta from the Burren Smokehouse spoke about combining her love of the west of Ireland with her passion for organic smoked salmon.

All of this wonderful food for thought was washed down with Irish craft beers such as Orpens Irish Cider, O’ Haras Curim Gold and Trouble Brewing’s Sabotage IPA and enjoyed with wine favourites such as Yann Chave Crozes-Hermitage Blanc and Thalran Syrah Castell d’Encus.

Farm Dinner

A tour and insight into the organic ely family farm from Hugh Robson finished off nicely, what was an extremely special day out for us in the Burren, Co. Clare. We, at ely, were extremely privileged to share with our guests, the passion that our Burren community, friends and family feel about all of the different work that they are engaged in.

To experience ely’s organic family farm in The Burren, Co. Clare, without having to leave Dublin, visit any of our 3 ely venues. 

horses and cattle on the ely family farm

Craft beers and cocktails @ ely – Part 5

by Barry Rowan

Are you a Hop-Head?

hop_head

 Because if you are you’ll want to look at a few of the double IPAs in this post.

IPAs or Indian Pale Ales are a style of beer that generally have a higher ABV (alcohol by volume) and normally have a stronger hoppier taste. When exporting beer from the UK over to India, they used to increase the alcoholic volume from around 3.5% to around 5.5% as the alcohol would act as a stabilizer for export. In addition to that extra hops were added, which also act as a natural preservative. Thus the IPA was born and coincidently a good powerful hoppy beer goes really well with very spicy food as the power of the beer is still noticeable even after a hot curry!

That’s what an IPA is. Now a DOUBLE IPA is basically the same as above, only more! -They are generally hoppier and hold a bigger abv. Typically between 6.5%-9% but some brewers are really playing around with this style and pushing the boundries to make them hoppier and more alcoholic.

RavenThornbridge, Wild Raven – 6.6% ABV

500ml bottle

Voted World’s Best IPA 2012 and 2013 at the World Beer Awards. This is a black IPA.
The use of chocolate malts (as you see in many porters/stouts) gives the beer depth and complexity.
In balance to that it uses centennial hops to give it bitterness and hoppy characters.

One of or milder double ipa’s at 6.6abv.

 

 


Oharas_ipa

O’Hara’s, Double IPA – 7.5% ABV

500ml bottle

A full-bodied, full-on Double IPA combining caramel and malt flavours with a well-balanced and substantial bitterness, which is topped off by a tantalising hop aroma with notes of tangerine and grapefruit.
Light carbonation allows the full flavour of this beer to shine through.

 

 


Galway Bay, Of Foam of Fury – 8.5% ABV

Galway_Bay_foam_and_fury

500ml bottle

The Mac-Daddy of them all, this double IPA from the Galway Bay Brewery is quite the handful.
It is still a well-balanced IPA with a “malt backbone” but still has the great characteristic flavours of orange peel, cumin and pine. This little beaut kicks like a mule, so watch you step when you eventually get up from your seat as you might not know what hit you!

 

 


Trouble Brewing, Chasing the Dragon – 8% ABV

trouble_brewing

356ml draught

This is a once off brew from the lads in the Trouble Brewing and after tasting it down in the brewery a few weeks back, I was keen to get my hands on some.
Brewed especially for the craft beer festival in the RDS in Agusut 2014, this double IPA has it all. A good powerful, punchy beer with a good hoppy taste.
However, in keeping with the trouble style it has a good amount of malt in the beer which balances the against the bitter hops, resulting in a fine, smooth double IPA which is not overpowering and quite enjoyable to neck!

 

tips, tipples & table talk – Week 16

Slight warning folks, our dessert recipe in this week’s tips, tipples & table talk is sure to have your mouth watering so reader discretion (during work hours or you know, on a public bus…) is advised! We’ve also got some Bavarian beverages you might like to enjoy during Oktoberfest Dublin and we discuss what makes farming in the Burren, Co. Clare so very special.

Enjoy!

Tipple Tip(s) of the Week: Oktoberfest Dublin

In excitement of Oktoberfest arriving to George’s Dock (Dublin 1) this Thursday 18th, we’re getting our Bavarian dirndl dress and lederhosen together, and planning which German tipples we’ll be enjoying this week (and no, not all at the same time).

Oktoberfest-Dublin

  1. Erdinger Weissbier – From one of the world’s largest wheat beer breweries and the official sponsor of this year’s Oktoberfest Dublin, is one of the most famous weissbiers. While it is fruity, what we enjoy is that it isn’t too sweet either. Light and easily drinkable, this is a great thirst quenching beer.
  2. Paulaner Hefe-Weissbier – A well balanced wheat beer, you can certainly taste the yeast and banana, without it being too overpowering. Quite sweet which compliments the light bitterness, this medium bodied Weizen is fresh and flavoursome.
  3. Krombacher Pils This German Pilsner has nearly an all grain flavour with a minimal hop taste. This is a crisp and light bodied beer, best enjoyed on a warmer Autumn’s day. Brewed with natural spring water, this provides its refreshing taste.
  4. Wagner Stempel Spätburgunder – A German Pinot Noir, from the Wagner-Stempel winery encapsulates all that is great about Pinot as a variety, and Germany as a wine producer. This softly perfumed wine is delicate but beautifully flavoured, with raspberry, cherry and redcurrant flavours.

Pop in and enjoy ely bar & brasserie, IFSC, Dublin 1, when visiting Oktoberfest Dublin.

Oktoberfest Dublin Tipples

Taste Tip of the Week: Jamaican Coffee Pecan Brownies

As the days get cooler, we step away from lighter desserts and enjoy heartwarming indulgent classics. These gorgeous brownies are heavenly served with ice-cream and also ideal for storing as treats for your coffee break – if you can resist them for that long!

jamaican brownie collage

What you need:

  • 400g caster sugar
  • 375g unsalted butter
  • 75g cocoa powder
  • 3 tbsp finely ground Jamaican blue mountain (or your favourite) coffee beans
  • ½ tsp salt
  • 3 large eggs
  • 1½ tsp vanilla extract
  • 150g plain flour
  • 100g pecan halves
  • 6 tbsp freshly brewed Jamaican coffee
  • 100g dark chocolate,
  • 70% cocoa solids, chopped (Valrhona is ideal)
  • 30 thin strips crystallised ginger, or candied orange peel
  • icing sugar, for dusting

Makes 15

How we do it:

  • Line a baking tray, measuring approx 38 x 26cm, with greaseproof paper, or lightly grease a glass ovenproof dish. A lasagne dish is ideal. The tray or dish should be 2cm minimum in depth.
  • Combine the sugar, butter, cocoa, ground coffee and salt in a metal or heatproof bowl.
  • Place the bowl over a saucepan of simmering water and leave until the butter melts, stirring occasionally to help blend the ingredients – the texture will be grainy.
  • Remove the bowl from the water and allow the mixture to cool to lukewarm.
  • Whisk in the eggs and vanilla
  • Sieve the flour over and fold in.
  • Take three-quarters of the pecan halves and roll up inside a clean tea towel. Bash lightly with a rolling pin to break up. Stir the pieces into the mix.
  • Pour the freshly brewed coffee over the mixture with the chocolate and stir until melted and smooth.
  • Pour the mixture into the prepared dish or tray and spread evenly.
  • Allow to cool and thicken for approximately 1 hour.
  • Preheat the oven to 180°C. Bake in the oven for 25 minutes or until a skewer inserted into the brownies comes out clean.
  • Remove from the oven and cut into squares.

Dress the brownies with the reserved pecans and ginger or candied orange peel. Dust with icing sugar. Serve warm with vanilla ice-cream.

Or, let us do the work for you! Homemade desserts by ely’s executive pastry chef available at ely wine bar, 22 Ely Place.

Pecan Jamaican Coffee Brownies

Table Talk of the Week: What Makes Farming in The Burren So Special?

For those of you who aren’t aware, the ely organic family farm is located in the Burren, Co. Clare (refresher here). Often people have asked us why we have chosen to keep our farm there and what makes farming in the Burren so special.

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The beauty of farming in the Burren, Co. Clare lies in the fact that it has been farmed in the same fashion for 6,000 – 7,000 years. This way of farming, where your animals are up on the hills in the winter months, is unique only to the Burren, Co. Clare. Due to its limestone structure, the Burren landscape acts almost as a storage heater. The land receives heat from the Atlantic drift in the summer and it stores that heat for the winter as the soil depths are so shallow. Gentle heat releases from the limestone all winter making for very little frost, and allowing the animals to be happier and warmer on the hill (also called the winterage) than in the valley. The animals then come down to the valley for the spring and summer months.

Burren Farmland.

Also unique to the Burren is the way in which land is distributed. Land in The Burren is sold, not by the area, but by the numbers of animals you keep or feed. Summer land is matched with the winter land and you always have enough winter land to maintain the animals you keep on the summer land. Many of the cattle farmers in the Burren might produce calves in the spring, feed them on the rich pastures of the valley in the summer, sell the calves in the autumn and put the cattle back up on the winterage in the winter.

Life in the Burren always works as a balance.

We source all of our grass fed beef, pork and lamb through our organic family farm in The Burren, Co. Clare. 

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Craft beers and cocktails @ ely – Part 4

by Barry Rowan

This week I was going to take a look at some of the stouts/porters. Guinness, one of the most influential and iconic brands within the vintners industry, is something we will not be discussing! We will be looking at some of the other lesser known but, IMO, far superio r stouts that appear on our list. These stouts have far more flavour and complexity in comparison to Guinness and should definitely be explored and discussed.

Ohara_stoutO Hara’s Celtic stout
4.3% abv

This stout has a robust flavour with a full bodied and smooth mouth feel.
The roast flavours lead to a dry espresso like finish. A generous addition of fuggles hops lead to a tart bitterness which mingles with the roast espresso flavours on the tongue.

Try this for a more authentic stout taste.

 

 

 

 

 

old_engineOld Engine Oil
ABV6%

This beer from the Harviston brewery in the Uk is a real winner.
Probably the first “other” stout that I really appreciated. This pens its name from the consistency of the beer. Thick, rich and dense in appearance and taste, this stout has it all. Lush sweetness carries chocolate and coffee flavours to the beholder and the punchy alcohol and subtle bitterness cleans your mouth out and leaves you wanting more.

 

 

 

 

tavernTavern porter
ABV 4.7%

Made in the UK by the Thwaites brewery, this is a medium bodied porter.
It has all the usual stuff that is associated with porter; coffee, liquorice and chocolate but it has a good carbonation to it, which makes it light and drinkable. I always find with this beer, that it’s best enjoyed when it begins to come to room temperature.

Definitely a beer to have in front of the fire or enjoyed while reading a book

 

 

 

OharaO hara’s Leann Follain
ABV6%

This is a double stout, which means that it has a higher percentage of alcohol and a bit more body. However, this is certainly a diferrent beer to the celtic stout that O’Hara’s brews. This is higher in alcohol and does have more body, but it’s also sweeter and far more balanced than it’s little brother. It’s like the recipe has been reduced down to be made more concentraded. This is much better enjoyed slightly below room temperature to allow it’s flavours to open up and be appreciated.

 

 

 

StPetersburgSt Petersburg Russian Imperial Stout
7.4%ABV

This is an excellent beer and excellent style of beer. There aren’t many of these around and you should always make sure to try a Russian Imperial Stout at some point. The Thornbridge brewery has become one of the most awarded brewery’s in the UK. This stout doesn’t disappoint either. It’s power may put some of you off in terms of its potency, but it actually is a flavoursome, round beer which can be good for just sipping on, but as a beer “enthusiast” this holds its own in terms of complexity.

ely tips, tipples & table talk 15

In this week’s tips, tipples & table talk, we’re getting ready for that fabulously cultural time of the year again that is Culture Night 2014. We also take a look at your granny’s favourite wine and why it’s so misunderstood – The Fantastic World of Sherry and enjoy a brilliantly simple salmon tartare recipe that you can whip up in seconds, but shhh, who needs to know, and looks seriously impressive.

Enjoy folks!

Table Talk of the Week: Culture Night 

Set to be biggest ever with more outdoor events, this year’s Culture Night will see locals and visitors across the island of Ireland enjoy the unique experience of Culture Night, a free night of entertainment, discovery and adventure taking place in a record 28 towns, cities, counties and islands in Ireland. Museums, galleries, churches, historic houses, artists’ studios and cultural centres will open their doors late into the evening welcoming people of all ages to taste and sample their cultural delights for free on the evening.

Culture Night 2014 will take place on Friday September 19th from 5pm-11pm.

Watch out for Cultural Quarters:

Greater Dublin
Heuston / Museum Quarter
Historic Quarter
North Georgian Quarter
South Georgian Quarter
Temple Bar & North of Liffey
Trinity College/Docklands

Tipple Tip of the Week: The Fantastic World of Sherry 

Is it still the most misunderstood of all wines? We’re inclined to think so.
Even now, despite Sherry being loved and lauded in the wine press for years, we still meet people who think of is just as a “granny drink”– their words, not ours.

So let’s set a few things straight- Sherry is one of the most wonderful and varied of all wine styles, and there is a style one for everyone. From bone-dry, tangy Manzanilla, nutty, caramelised Amontillado or for the truly decadent, try a Moscatel of PX.
Secondly, these wines are often remarkable value for money. A glass of Fino or Manzanilla – perfect aperitif- will usually cost about half what you would pay for a decent glass of white. The sweeter wines, such as those mentioned above, are not just ridiculously good value next to more familiar dessert wines, they are also incredibly versatile – try them with, dark chocolate, caramel, nuts, figs, cheese and much more.

The problem we have with Sherry is simply perception, or mis-perception, and the best way to fix that is education. So, to do our bit in the struggle to reinstate Sherry to its rightful, lofty position we have arranged a Sherry tasting masterclass with none other than César Saldaña. When it comes to Sherry, this guy is THE MAN!
He’s like the Godfather of the entire Sherry industry, and he’s making one visit to Ireland this year – just to talk to you!
The tasting will be held in ely bar & brasserie on Wednesday 17th at 7pm. We will be having some wonderful tapas-style dishes to accompany the tastings. Tickets are €20 and are very strictly limited. This is a one-time only opportunity to learn from the very best, and sample some wonderful wines in the process.

Hey, bring your granny- because she’s known this all along…..
Tickets can be purchased online www.elywinebar.com/tastings or by calling Ian Brosnan on (01) 6787867.

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Taste Tip of the Week: Salmon Tartare with Watercress & Cucumber Ribbons

salmon

What you need:

  • What you need
  • 1 cucumber
  • 200g fresh, organic,
  • Irish farmed salmon
  • small bunch dill
  • 2 small shallots
  • 50g crème fraîche
  • juice of ¼ lemon
  • rock salt, black pepper
  • 50g watercress
  • mixed leaves and
  • brown bread, to serve
    Serves 4

How We Do It:

  • Take a peeler and run it from the top to the tail of the whole, unpeeled cucumber to create 4 long strips – these will be used to wrap the salmon. You should end up with long, translucent strips with dark green borders on either side. The borders will help the strips hold their shape.
  • Dice the salmon, dill and shallots. Reserve 4 tsp crème fraîche. Place the salmon, dill and shallots
    in a bowl with the remaining crème fraîche and lemon juice, mixing well to ensure all ingredients
    are coated. Season to taste.
  • Divide the salmon mix into 4 and place each portion in the centre of a plate in a cylindrical shape.
    Wrap each one with a cucumber strip. Place 1 tsp crème fraîche on top of each portion. Pick and
    wash the watercress and place a few leaves on top of each bundle of salmon. Sprinkle with rock salt.
  • Serve with mixed leaves and traditional brown bread, if liked.
  • A note for the cook
    You want to make sure the taste of the fresh dill comes through; half of one of the packets you can
    buy at the supermarket should be about right.

Enjoy alternative twists to classic dishes at ely bar & brasserie.

salmon

 

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