The 15 Series, Week 3: 15 Seasonal Sips For Winter

ely restaurants celebrates its 15th birthday this year and each week, The 15 Series brings you 15 tips on topics such as food, wine, culture, lifestyle, craft beer and more!

#ely15years

 

15 Seasonal Sips For Winter

As winter approaches, tropical fruits, rosés and lighter beers move over for robust reds, fuller whites, apples, cinnamon and warming drinks. Here are 15 craft beers, cocktails and wines to enjoy this season.

1. Pietra 

An intriguing Corsican amber beer with sweet chestnut flavours, this tipple is a nice one for winter as it also has a touch of spice and citrus. These spices, combined with nuttiness and surprising caramel hints, makes Pietra a unique and light choice for that first drink on a cold evening.


2. Spiced Apple Grog
oktoberfest4

Photo credit: ely restaurants

Cocktails featuring spices will be everywhere next season and drinking them hot is one of the best ways to enjoy them. Spiced Apple Grog contains Jameson, Highbank Drivers Cider (N/A, GF and organic), cinnamon shavings and “Ireland’s answer to maple syrup”, Highbank organic orchard syrup. Serve hot and enjoy at home at the end of a long day, or let us make it for you at ely bar & brasserie, (the Chq Building), Dublin 1.


3. John Duval “Plexus” Shiraz Grenache Mourvedre

Winter calls for something warming and decadent and this wine, from the Barossa Valley in Australia, delivers on both counts. Velvety smooth, spicy and lush, think of a glass of this as a hot-water bottle for the soul.


4. Cloughmore Dark Water Stout

Cloughmore Dark Water Stout is brewed in the foothills of the Mourne mountains and draws its main ingredient from  the local water supplied from the reservoir, making this an unfiltered craft Irish Stout. With a body of roasted barley and oats with accompanying light chocolate flavours, this makes a nice change from the usual stout we tend to return to drinking this time of the year.


5. Michael Collins

Photo credit: ely restaurants

Using a whiskey substitute instead of gin in the classic Tom Collins adds a little more winter depth and results in the refreshing and fruity Michael Collins. If making it at home, shake a good Irish whiskey, fresh lemon juice, sugar and strain into a glass. Add ice cubes, carbonated water and stir. Or sit back and enjoy as we rustle one up for you at ely bar & brasserie, (the Chq Building), Dublin 1.


6. Champagne Dravigny Godbillon ‘Cuvee Ambre’ Brut     
Dravigny Godbillon ‘Cuvee Ambre’ Brut

Photo credit: http://www.vivino.com

The festive season rolls around and many of us fill with cheer. If the time does come to break out the bubbles this year, why not try one from a small, virtually unknown Champagne house who make some outstanding wines. Their style is akin to some of the more famous ( and expensive) Grand Marque Houses. A blend of 60% Pinot Noir, 25% Chardonnay and 15% Pinot Meunier, this is a wonderfully rich and biscuity Champagne.


7. Craigies Dalliance Cider

Lover of wine but not a fan of cider? The folks at Craigies have hit the nail on the head with Dalliance. Not too sweet, Dalliance is dry and made with not one but three Irish apple varieties. This light bodied cider is sure to please many this season.


 8. Cognac Cure
From Rio to paris

Photo credit: instagram.com/aytoxyz

 A warming and comforting drink, Cognac is a perfect tipple for this time of the year. In this cocktail, the sourness of fresh lime juice mixed with the sweet taste of the honey compliments the rich taste of the Cognac. Combine with a splash of  carbonated water and top with ice. DIY or enjoy it at ely bar & brasserie, (the Chq Building), Dublin 1.


9. Kir-Yianni Xinomavro “Ramnista”

A revelation and certainly one to enjoy during these darker days with dimmed lights. Produced from the Xinomavro grape, this Greek wine, with its hints of dark fruits, is a vinous superstar waiting to be discovered. Best described as combining the seductive qualities of Pinot with the structure of Nebbiolo.


10. Pauwel Kwak

With one of the coolest glasses out there, you might be led to thinking that this Belgian strong ale is all hat and no cattle. However, Kwak is all substance! Rich and velvety with subtle hints of caramel and spice, this is probably our top choice of winter craft brew.


11. Hot Wine Lemonade
hot wine lemonade

Photo credit: ely restaurants

Hot wine? Wine lemonade? Surprisingly, all of the ingredients to this winter warming cocktail do work really well together. We use a splash of Bordeaux, fresh lemon juice, sugar syrup and hot water. Don’t knock it ’til you try it, available at ely bar & brasserie, (the Chq Building), Dublin 1.


12. Domaine Alary “La Brunotte” Cairanne Côte du Rhône

A perennial favourite at ely over the years, this is a classic of its kind. Perfect for these months with its dark berry fruit, white pepper and Christmas spice, along with fantastic length. This is the type of wine that makes us happy, every time.


13. Williams Brothers Joker IPA

This nice and fruity IPA is probably one of Williams Brothers’ best. Joker IPA offers a lovely  hop taste along with fresh and light citrus notes. Not to be mistaken for a summer beer, this easy-going, drinkable IPA can be enjoyed right into the winter months.


14. Winter Berry Cosmo
winter berry cosmo

Photo credit: ely restaurants

Autumn brought the best of the seasonal berries and we don’t know about you but there’s only so much jam we can enjoy! We’re taking those frozen berries and putting them to use for the winter months. For a Winter Berry Cosmo, include the berries in with the usual mix of vodka, fresh cranberry & lime juice and orange liqueur or fine blend the berries as a delicious replacement for the cranberry juice.


15. Les Hauts de Montforts Minervois
Les Hautes

Photo credit: http://www.vivino.com

Predominantly made from old vine Grenache, this is full-bodied perfect red for the winter months. With woody herbs, dark fruit and soft tannins this is the wine of choice for sitting by the fire.


All of the wines mentioned above are available to enjoy at ely wine bar, 22 Ely Place, Dublin 2 and ely bar & brasserie, IFSC, Dublin 1

All of the cocktails & craft beers mentioned above are available to enjoy at ely bar & brasserie, IFSC, Dublin 1.

tips, tipples & table talk – Week 17

This week’s tips, tipples & table talk  is all about the beautiful Burren. We fill you in on our 15th year anniversary trip to our family farm and let you almost imagine it, as if you were there, and could feel the country air. We also infuse Moroccan and Burren cuisine with a gorgeous lamb tagine recipe, perfect for these Autumn months and we discuss some wine phrases in an ely urban dictionary’d language you can understand.

Enjoy!

Tipple Tip(s) of the Week: Wine Phrases Without the Pretension

Have you ever had somebody describe wine and find yourself nodding along without a clue? More often than not, these terms means something very simple and we’ve picked a few of the ones that some people struggle with, in a language you can understand. There are wine bores, there are wine snobs and there are those – like you and I – that just like wine.Big tasting

  • Austere

They say: Wines that are austere are generally not terribly pleasant wines to drink. An austere wine is a hard, rather dry wine that lacks richness.

We say: An austere wine is not necessarily a negative one. This would be that seemingly stern and formal gent you get seated next to at a dinner party. The quiet type, but as the evening goes on, you start to realise that there’s a lot more to them and certainly, they’re more fun the more you get to know them. 

  • Barnyard

They say: An unclean, farmyard, fecal aroma that is imparted to a wine because of unclean barrels or unsanitary wine-making facilities.

We say: Well that sounds horrible! Old Burgundys and sometimes, old Rhones, can take on aromas that you might find in, say, a “recently” cleaned stable or perhaps by the carriages around Stephen’s Green. Thankfully this is a great example of how wines don’t always taste like they smell.

  • Bouquet:

They say: As a wine’s aroma becomes more developed from bottle aging, the aroma is transformed into a bouquet that is more than just the smell of the grape.

We say: Really… just a poncey word to describe the scent of a wine.

  • Tannic:

They say: The tannins of a wine, which are extracted from the grape skins and stems, are, along with a wine’s acidity and alcohol, its lifeline. Tannins give a wine firmness and some roughness when young, but gradually fall away and dissipate.

We say: Tannins are what give red wine its colour and dries out your mouth.. A tannic wine is also what’ll what give you away the morning after, with your black teeth and stained lips! 

  • Hot:

They say: Wines with alcohol levels in excess of 14.5% often taste hot if the requisite depth of fruit is not present.

We say: Feeling a little merrier than you expected you might at 6pm? A hot wine describes nothing to do with the temperature of the wine, but suggests that the alcohol levels in the wine are too high (yes, there is such a thing!).

  • Lush:

They say: Lush wines are soft, richly fruity wines that are both concentrated and fat. A lush wine can never be an astringent or hard wine.

We say: Not just a brand of natural cosmetics or  what a young British bloke might holler at a particularly good looking lady, a lush wine is rich, smooth, full, fruity, velvety. Highly desirable, a lush wine is basically the Jessica Rabbit of wines.

Learn more about wine at our BIGGEST wine tasting event of the year, ely’s Big Tasting on Friday 10th October, 2014 at ely bar & brasserie, IFSC.

the BIG tasting September 2011


Taste Tip of the Week: “Craggy Island” Lamb Tagine

There are a lot of ingredients in this recipe, but once you put a little bit of love into it, it’s really worth the effort. A Burren-Moroccan fusion dish and a nice alternative to the traditional Irish Stew.

What you need:

  • 800g–1kg lean lamb shoulder, diced (at ely, we use organic “Craggy Island” lamb)
  • plain flour, to coat lamb
  • extra virgin olive oil
  • 1 large Spanish onion
  • 1 each red and yellow peppers, diced
  • 2 large or 3 medium carrots, diced
  • 4 cloves garlic, crushed
  • 4 bay leaves
  • 1 sprig thyme, 1 sprig rosemary
  • 1 small, red chilli, dried or fresh
  • 2 cinnamon sticks
  • 10g fresh ginger, peeled and grated, or ½ tsp ground
  • 20g dried ground cumin
  • 100ml honey
  • 800g tinned chopped tomatoes or passata, or enough to submerge all ingredients
  • 1 aubergine
  • 1 courgette

Serves 6

Lamb Tagine Collage

How we do it:

  • Lightly coat the lamb in flour and brown in a little oil on a hot pan. You will need to do this in batches. Set aside and remove any excess fat.
  • In one large frying pan (or two, if necessary), fry the onion, peppers, carrots and garlic in some olive oil until they are soft.
  • Add the lamb, bay leaves and fresh herbs.
  • Now add the chilli, cinnamon sticks, ginger and cumin. Stir well to coat the lamb and vegetables.
  • Drizzle the honey over the lamb, then pour in the tomatoes or passata. Stir well.
  • Reduce the heat to a simmer and cook for 1-2 hours, stirring occasionally. Take off the heat and leave to cool.
  • Slowly reheat the tagine when you are ready to serve.
  • Chop the aubergine and courgette into large chunks, fry in some olive oil and add to the tagine. Doing this last prevents the aubergine
    and courgette from being discoloured by the sauce.
  • Serve with couscous (see note for the cook).

A note for the cook:

  • This delicious lamb tagine tastes even better the day after cooking, when the flavours have had a chance to blend and settle.
  • It’s best served with couscous. Rub oil into the couscous (before cooking) to prevent it sticking together.
  • Mix equal quantities of hot stock and couscous, cover with cling film and leave for 5 minutes.
  • Remove the cling film and run a fork through the couscous to separate.
  • Season, add some fresh mint, and serve.

Enjoy grass fed, organic “Craggy Island” lamb, sourced through our family farm in the Burren, Co. Clare at ely wine bar, 22 Ely Place.

craggy island lamb


Table Talk of the Week: ely’s Farm Trip to the Burren, Co. Clare 

On Tuesday 23rd September, to kick off ely’s 15th year celebrations, a gang of us slipped on our wellies, tucked our ponchos into our bags and headed out for a fun filled and insightful trip to the ely organic family farm in the Burren, Co. Clare.

The day started bright and early at 8am with the warming scent of homemade sausage rolls and brownies laid out for breakfast at ely bar & brasserie, IFSC. Fed, watered and one chorus of Irish mammy style “make sure you go to the restroom before we leave” later and we were off on the 3 hour luxury coach to Clare.

Our first stop found us outside of the coach and inside our TV boxes, at “Craggy Island Parochial House”. Father Ted’s house, the McCormacks’ organic farm, is where all of ely’s delicious organic lamb is reared. Cheryl McCormack, the lovely lady of the house, treated the gang to scrumptious home baking using only organic ingredients; scones, brown bread, home made jams made from their own fruit, organic tea and coffee, served in a welcoming home atmosphere. Patrick McCormack, the first speaker of the day, so eloquently recited the poem Lost” and discussed the simplicity and passion of a simple Burren farm life along with a much needed reminder, to always try to take a little “Burren time” for ourselves, in our fast paced and busy lives.

“Stand still. Stand still. The trees ahead and bushes beside you. Are not lost.” – David Wagoner

Outside Father Ted's

The beauty of farming in the Burren, Co. Clare lies in the fact that it has been farmed in the same fashion for 6,000 – 7,000 years. We then visited a site, which to the naked eye might have just seemed like grass, rock and shrubbery, but which was in fact the home to rare and unique Burren flora and fauna. Paula and Sharon from the Burren Life Project spoke to the group about the importance of Burren landscape preservation, the difficulties that organic Burren farming faces and the strict grazing methods being used to counteract these difficulties.

Group at Burren Life Project

Following this, in true Irish fashion, the clouds began to darken and the drizzle appeared. With a few rumbling tummies and rain jackets zipped up to the neck, we hopped back in to the coach and headed off to the home of Hugh and Isobel Robson, the organic ely family farm, for a much anticipated farm lunch.

Having worked up an appetite, we were in for a treat. What awaited us was a feast of Burren produce featuring organic Burren beef tongue with black truffles, organic porchetta rolled in local Burren herbs and succulent organic Burren rib, all from the ely family farm. We also enjoyed nori, dillisk and kombu smoked organic salmon from the Burren Smokehouse and homemade MOPE (Most Oppressed People Ever) potato cakes from the Burren Spud Project, all accompanied with salads, quiche, artisan Burren cheeses, ely’s homemade Guinness bread and 7-day pickled eggs. Deirdre from the Burren Spud project spoke about the importance of the humble potato in the global food crisis while Birgitta from the Burren Smokehouse spoke about combining her love of the west of Ireland with her passion for organic smoked salmon.

All of this wonderful food for thought was washed down with Irish craft beers such as Orpens Irish Cider, O’ Haras Curim Gold and Trouble Brewing’s Sabotage IPA and enjoyed with wine favourites such as Yann Chave Crozes-Hermitage Blanc and Thalran Syrah Castell d’Encus.

Farm Dinner

A tour and insight into the organic ely family farm from Hugh Robson finished off nicely, what was an extremely special day out for us in the Burren, Co. Clare. We, at ely, were extremely privileged to share with our guests, the passion that our Burren community, friends and family feel about all of the different work that they are engaged in.

To experience ely’s organic family farm in The Burren, Co. Clare, without having to leave Dublin, visit any of our 3 ely venues. 

horses and cattle on the ely family farm

tips, tipples & table talk – Week 13

We are thrilled to kick off this week’s tips, tipples & table talk with some great news! As well as this, we have a heartwarming-ly delicious brekkie recipe for that brunch dish with a difference. People often ask us about decanting wine, whether it’s worth the time and effort so this week we’ve got a few tips for you on when you decan… and when you decant (sorry).

Enjoy!

Table Talk of the Week: Food & Wine Magazine Awards

“This year’s winner was one of the first places in Ireland to take wine by the glass seriously and still manages to lead in this area, most notably this year, for the stand it has taken on wine pricing. A leader rather than a follower.” – Food & Wine Magazine, Restaurant of the Year Awards 2014

food and wine awards 2014

We, at ely, are delighted to have been awarded Best Wine Experience in Ireland at the Food & Wine Magazine Awards on Sunday. The award was in recognition, not just of our wine tasting education and wine lists, but also our extensive selection of wines by the glass and “inspirational” pricing.

We would like to take this time to say a massive thank you to everyone at Food & Wine Magazine for the much appreciated recognition, to all of our staff for their incredible hard work, and a special thank you to all of our amazing customers for their continued support.

To see more on ely’s wine value price promise (as covered by Forbes) click here.

ely erik&michelle

Tipple Tip of the Week: Decan or Decant?

In our opinion, it’s always worth decanting a wine, irrespective of the cost and there is actually, quite little effort involved! You don’t actually need any special equipment to decant. The only exception is when it comes to a very old wine – its delicate structure may disintegrate when exposed to too much air, so it’s best served straight from the bottle (and poured slowly).

Decanting Wine 3

Follow the guidelines below to make the most of your wine:

  • Leave your bottle standing for at least an hour before you open it, it helps the sediment fall to the bottom of the bottle.
  • Decant your wine – even if you just have 10 minutes before your pizza’s ready, it’s still worthwhile.
  • Either buy a decanter (you don’t have to spend too much), or use any good-sized glass container – a jug or a vase works fine.
  • Pour gently and steadily down one side.
  • Leave to sit somewhere cool until you’re ready to drink it.
  • Remember you can a decant full-bodied white wine, too – especially if it has spent a long time in the fridge.

Learn more about wine in a fun and informal way at an ely wine tasting experience

decanting wine

Taste Tip of the Week: Eggy Bread with Strawberry Jam & Clotted Cream

Growing tired of the usual breakfast fry (“never!” we hear some of you cry) or just fancy a change? Sometimes the simplest dishes create the fondest memories. An unbelievably simple, yet great, Sunday brunch favourite from us here at ely.

eggy bread 1

What you need:

  • 4 organic eggs (yolks only of 3, and 1 whole)
  • 250ml milk
  • 8 slices bread (a doughy white bread works well here)
  • 40g unsalted butter
  • 200g strawberries
  • 150g caster sugar
  • 1 tub clotted cream, to serve
    Serves 4

How We Do It:

  • Whisk 3 egg yolks and 1 whole egg together with the milk.
  • Soak the bread in this mixture for a few seconds, then fry in butter until golden brown, allowing 10g butter per 2 slices bread.
  • Ensure you wipe the pan clean each time to avoid burning the butter.
  • To make the jam, wash the strawberries and remove the stalks. Cut into quarters.
  • Place the sugar in a pot with 3-4 tsp water.
  • Heat gently until the sugar dissolves, then add the strawberries.
  • Simmer for 10-15 minutes. Mash lightly with a fork and leave to cool.
  • Serve the fried bread with the cream and jam on the side, and a pot of your favourite coffee.

Enjoy alternative twists to classic heartwarming dishes at ely bar & brasserie.

eggy bread collage

 

 

tips, tipples & table talk – Week 10

Is the phrase ‘leftover wine’ an oxymoron? We know a few friends and colleagues that might think so! Nonetheless, this week’s tips, tipples and table talk has a few ideas on what to do with that leftover wine. We also have an easy, simple risotto recipe for you to try, and we introduce you to the newest, hairiest member of the ely family – and no it’s not our new sous chef Steve (kidding)!

In case you missed it last week, don’t forget that we’re giving 10% back to you, our fantastic ely customers, all summer when you use your ely loyalty card. Don’t have one yet? And if not, why not? Sign up here

Taste Tip of the Week: Simple Risotto 

This popular dish is perfect for serving at a dinner party but equally so, easy enough to make for a delicious dinner at home for one. Light enough to eat during the summer heat, you can also include almost any ingredients to adapt to your tastes. Here’s a simple risotto recipe for you to try.

What you need:

  • 1.75 litres vegetable or chicken stock
  • 4 tbsp olive oil
  • 1 small onion, finely chopped
  • 350g risotto rice
  • 85g butter
  • 6 tbsp grated parmesan cheese, plus extra for serving
  • rock salt, black pepper

How we do it:

  • Bring the stock to a boil in a medium-sized saucepan. Reduce the heat and allow to simmer gently.
  • In a separate pan, heat the olive oil over a medium heat.
  • Add the onion and, stirring all the time with a wooden spoon, cook until it softens and becomes translucent.
  • Add the rice and cook, stirring, for about 3 minutes, making sure that every grain is coated with oil.
  • Add 1 cup (250ml) of the stock and stir until absorbed.
  • Continue adding the stock, about ½ cup (125ml) at a time, stirring frequently and making sure all the liquid is absorbed before adding more.
  • When most of the stock has been added – this should take about 15-20 minutes – test a grain of rice.
  • The risotto is ready when the rice is just tender and creamy, but still ‘al dente’, with a little bite to it.
  • Remove the pan from the heat and add the butter, parmesan cheese, salt and pepper to taste.
  • Stir vigorously for about 30 seconds to give a creamy, glossy finish to the risotto
  • Add in mushrooms, asparagus, butternut squash, prawns etc. Whatever you fancy – get creative!

You can now enjoy our great value early-bird menu all evening, Mon – Sat at ely bar & brasserie, IFSC. 

risotto collage

Tipple Tip of the Week: What To Do With Leftover Wine

As our executive wine manager Ian Brosnan would argue, leftover wine is somewhat of a myth. However, we do know that sometimes you are faced with some leftover wine and the thought of throwing it down the sink (we can’t watch!) pains you. Therefore, we’ve put together a few useful tips, cooking being the most obvious (great for also popping a good splash of white in when making the above risotto recipe!), on what to do with the remains from the bottom of the bottle.

ely empty wine glass

  1. Freeze Please – First things first, fill an ice cube tray with your leftover wine and pop it straight in the freezer. Now you can use a cube or two for cooking whenever you need to.
  2. Wine Syrup – This rich syrup a bit tangy, similar to Balsamic vinegar but simmering the syrup with cinnamon or vanilla makes it sweet and delicious enough to use on pancakes or with ice cream. In a wide saucepan, combine red wine with sugar (3 cups wine to 1 cup sugar), bring to a boil, then reduce heat and simmer until syrupy and reduced to about a third of the volume. Let cool, bottle, and refrigerate.
  3. Save For Mulled Wine Season – Put leftover red wine into a freezable container and for use in the winter months. Empty the frozen wine into a large pot; add spices such as cinnamon sticks and a spoonful of whole cloves. Melt wine over medium heat, then sweeten to taste with honey, sugar, or apple juice. Simmer for 10 minutes. Serve in glasses with a citrus slice.
  4. Poaching – Soft foods taste amazing when poached  in wine flavored with aromatics and spices. White wine for eggs and fish, and sweetened red wine is perfect for poaching fruit.
  5. Salad Dressing – Leftover white wine makes for a flavoursome, fresh-tasting salad dressing. Blend wine, lemon juice, honey (if wine is sweet, leave out the honey) salt, and pepper in a bowl. Still blending (either with a fork, whisk, or the blender), slowly add olive oil. Voilà!

Learn more about wine in a fun and informal setting at an ely wine tasting evening. 

Table Talk of the Week: New Addition To The ely Family Farm

Well well, who do we have here? These magnificent creatures, and the newest additions to the ely organic family farm, are Highland cattle descendants from Scotland. These cattle are extremely adept at grazing on steep, mountainous lands which makes the limestone rocky slopes in The Burren, Co. Clare, an ideal place for them to rest.

10565035_705317519540220_2133458680609422700_n

Natural born survivors, the Highland cattle’s long horns were developed to protect themselves and their flowing locks grown to shelter them from harsh, cold winters – which makes us think they must be a little warm at the moment! Their short, stumpy legs provide them with excellent balance and surprisingly, Highland cattle can be found up to 10,000 feet high up in the Andes.

Welcome to the farm guys!

We source all of our grass fed beef, pork and lamb through our organic family farm in The Burren, Co. Clare. 

 

 

ely wines for Summer #010 – Final part!

CA10

Here goes a recap on some of the wines we’ve featured over the last couple of weeks. I’ve attached the list of wines below- hopefully you had an opportunity to try at least some of them. If you haven’t, don’t worry- there is plenty of time left in this summer, and many of these wines are ely favourites, so they might be around into autumn.

What will I be drinking for the rest of the summer- well, in moderate quantities (obviously) and in no particular order…

German Riesling must be the ultimate summer wine, low in alcohol, crisp, fresh and with perfect fruit/acid balance. My #1 choice.

Italian whites – Italy is producing some wonderful white wines from native varieties which have far more character than you may have come to expect from Italian whites. Look out for-Pinot Bianco, Gavi, Lugana, Soave, Vermentino, Verdicchio, Falanghina, Fiano, Greco and Grillo.  And when you’ve done them, try Favorita, Erbaluce, Fruliano, Grechetto, Pecorino, Inzolia, Catarratto and Zibibbio. When you done with all of them, give me a shout and I’ll list some more!

Look east! We are finally starting to see more and more wines from Eastern Europe on our shelves, and some are mighty impressive. For whites in particular look to Slovenia, Slovakia, Croatia and Greece.

Lighter reds . Sounds obvious for summer, but where to look? Well start with the stunning Pinots from Germany and Northern Italy- there is one of each listed below.  Beaujolais may be struggling to regain the reputation it once had, but that is usually when they start making their best wines- a simple Beaujolais villages , served cool, in the garden with lunch or a light dinner makes for a perfect summer evening.

Sherry, Sherry,Sherry. Did I mention Sherry? It may still have its detractors, but its (fanatical) followers are getting louder and louder. Fino or Manzanilla, well chilled, with some straight-forward nibbles – olives, cured meats etc.  – is a match made in winey heaven.

ely wines for summer 2014:

Paparuda Pinot Noir, Timisoara, Romania 2012

Raphael Palacios ‘Bolo’ Godello, Valdeorras, Spain 2013

Wagner Stempel Riesling, Rheinhessen, Germany 2013

Franz Haas Pinot Nero, Alto-Adige, Italy 2010

Nyetimber English 2009 Classic Cuvee

Domaine Decelle-Villa Cote de Brouilly, Burgundy, France 2012

Cullen Sauvignon Blanc Semillon ‘Mangan Vineyard’, Margaret River, Western Australia 2011

G.D. Vajra Dolcetto d’Alba, Langhe, Piemonte 2012

Domaine Felines Jourdan Picpoul de Pinet, Coteaux du Languedoc 2013

Taittinger Champagne NV, France

Broglia la Meirana Gavi di Gavi, Italy 2013

Les Deux Cols ‘Cuvee Alize’ Cotes du Rhone, France 2012

Lucien Crochet ‘Le Chene’ Sancerre 2012

Domaine de Millet rosé Cotes de Gascogne 2013

Wagner Stempel Spätburgunder, Rheinhessen, Germany 2012

Hernando y Souridais ‘Antidoto’ Ribera del Duero, Spain 2011

Meursault ‘Les Vireuils’ Domaine Chavy-Chouet 2010

Domaine de la Janasse Chateauneuf-du-Pape 2009

Join us for an ely wine tasting evening and learn more about wines.

Each week a guest speaker will present a selection of wines from the given region and we’ll serve up a supper dish to match. All wine tastings take place at ely bar & brasserie and start at 7pm. See more at http://www.elywinebar.ie/about/wine-apreciation/ely-wine-tastings

 

ely wines for Summer #009

In celebrating Bastille Day (week) we have chosen a couple of French classics for this week! We appreciate that these are at the higher end of the price spectrum, but they are an absolute treat!

Meursault ‘Les Vireuils’ Domaine Chavy-Chouet 2010

chavy-chouet
Romaric Chavy is the 7th generation of his family to run this winery. Their vineyards are evenly divided between Meursault and Puligny Montrachet with holdings in many of the finest vineyards in both. Romaric has a clear vision of the style of wines he wants to produce, with the emphasis on freshness rather than creaminess, and minerality over oak. As a result, the wines see only 25-30% new oak, and minimum battonage. The 2010 ‘Les Vireuils’ is a perfect example of his vision- the nose is subtle yet complex, with aromas of white flower and citrus. The influence of the oak only becomes apparent on the palate, not as a flavour but as texture, rounding out the lemon-fresh streak. As the wine opens, the inherent richness of Meursault becomes more apparent, but never overcomes the precision and finesse of this superb wine. Just try to drink it slowly.

With food… Go all out and have a bottle of this with the amazing seafood platter in ely Winebar. Lobster- check… Dingle Bay brown crab.. check.. Carlingford oysters, prawn cocktail, tempura squid and much more.

 

Domaine de la Janasse Chateauneuf-du-Pape 2009

Chateauneuf-du-Pape
Chateauneuf-du-Pape might not strike you as a summer wine, and in most cases you’d probably be right. In fact, it’s a wine that many of us associate with winter, or even Christmas. But that doesn’t have to be the case. While some Chateauneuf is big and burly- all power and strength – there are some which are much more refined. Janasse is one of the latter. Put simply, it reminds us of why Chateauneuf-du-Pape is held in such high esteem. A blend of 80% Grenache with 10% each of Syrah and Mourvédre, its defining characteristics are elegance, purity and concentration. There are more famous names and more expensive wines produced in this region, but none match Janasse for quality, consistency and value.

With food…. Just keep it simple. Have some organic Burren beef from our family farm. A 28 day dry-aged fillet with mushroom wellington and horseradish mash in ely Bar & Brasserie should do the trick!

Check out the 8 previous parts of ely wines for Summer 2014:

ely wines for Summer #001

ely wines for Summer #002

ely wines for Summer #003

ely wines for Summer #004

ely wines for Summer #005

ely wines for Summer #006

ely wines for Summer #007

ely wines for Summer #008

Join us for an ely wine tasting evening and learn more about wines.
Each week a guest speaker will present a selection of wines from the given region and we’ll serve up a supper dish to match. All wine tastings take place at ely bar & brasserie and start at 7pm. See more at http://www.elywinebar.ie/about/wine-apreciation/ely-wine-tastings

ely wines for Summer #007

All French this week, and we’ve gone for two old favourites. Sancerre might seem a little obvious, but there is nothing common about the quality of this one (it’s practically perfect!). We are also all too aware that this weather can’t last forever, so it’s time to get your rosé on before it’s too late! Enjoy.

Lucien Crochet ‘Le Chene’ Sancerre 2012

Usually for our ‘Wines of Summer’ series we choose some of the more unusual, or less well known wines from our list. SancerreBut exceptions have to be made, especially with a wine as exceptional as this! Sourced from a vineyard of south-facing slopes and shallow limestone soil, this is as perfect an expression of sauvignon Blanc as you are ever likely to find! Pure, intense citrus and wet chalk on the nose, crisp grapefruit flavours on the palate and a long minerally finish. Where other sauvignons are pungent, tropical and often over the top, this it taut and precise, with incredible purity of flavour. Forget what you think you know about modern Sauvignon Blanc, go back to where it started and see how it can be done!

With food… The classic pairing is goats cheese, and it is fantastic with the Fivemiletown goats cheese salad. But it also works with simple fish or shellfish dishes, or try it with our heirloom tomato and peach salad!

 

Domaine de Millet rosé Cotes de Gascogne 2013

milletWhen the conversation turns to the “my favourite grape” discussion, Egiodola rarely gets a mention!! Not surprising really, very few of us have ever heard of it. This Domaine in the Cotes de Gascogne use this little know grape to make their wonderful rosé. In the glass it is a delicate, pink-salmon colour, with aromas of ripe strawberry and raspberry. The palate is fresh, fruity but refreshingly dry, making this a great wine to have with or without food. As we all know, our rosé season here in Ireland is frustratingly short, so grab a seat on the terrace and enjoy!

With food…. There is a very simple but effective guide for this- pink wines are great with pink food. So, in summertime, try it with Salmon, either grilled or cold in a salad, prawns simply cooked or even paella.

Check out ely wines for Summer 2014:

ely wines for Summer #001

ely wines for Summer #002

ely wines for Summer #003

ely wines for Summer #004

ely wines for Summer #005

ely wines for Summer #006

ely wines for Summer #007

ely wines for Summer #008

Join us for an ely wine tasting evening and learn more about wines.
Each week a guest speaker will present a selection of wines from the given region and we’ll serve up a supper dish to match. All wine tastings take place at ely bar & brasserie and start at 7pm. See more at http://www.elywinebar.ie/about/wine-apreciation/ely-wine-tastings

 

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